Ten Minute Meal :: Panzanella with Cannellini

The weather here has been a bit extreme. Unbearably hot and humid with a drying wind that burned what was left of my hydrangeas, then this week sunny, bright, and cool, with nights that required long sleeves and socks. But it’s still tomato season, and they are having their moment and should be utilized, even if I don’t feel like spending time in the kitchen.

With the start of school last week, and quite a number of adjustments to our schedule—relaxed or possibly even non-existent over the summer—this week, I’ve been a bit tapped out when dinner time rolls around. But there’s only so many days one can eat pasta or pizza, isn’t there?

Luckily, we are all fans of panzanella, which the kids call crouton salad, and we have a few variations that are the perfect thing to make when you don’t really feel like being in the kitchen. This one is my favorite version.

This here is a mix of canned and rinsed Cannellini beans, chopped ripe tomatoes (these are amazingly sweet yellow heirlooms), thinly sliced yellow bell pepper, a handful of parsley, and the leftover, sliced heart from the head of a Boston Bibb lettuce. Mixed together with the juice of two lemons, salt, pepper, and olive oil.

10min Beans N Greens

While that sits for a minute or two, I take some lovely sliced bread from a local baker, slather it with olive oil, stick it in the toaster, then stack and cut it into bite-sized chunks. This is such a time saver! Broiling takes too long, and I can’t count the number of times I burnt all the bread because I forgot it for a few extra seconds. As an added bonus the kids can help with this part while I sliced and toss the other ingredients.

Toasty Bread

First, the bread goes into the bowl… I like it to be the base to soak up all the juice from the tomatoes and lemon and olive oil.

In A Bowl

Then the other ingredients.

Lemons N Oil

Ten minutes. Well, maybe fifteen depending on how comfortable you are with a knife. Super simple, incredibly tasty, and no cooking required (toaster doesn’t count).

 

Food on Friday :: Ode to Omelettes

We eat quite a number of omelettes in this house.

Lovely Eggy Omelette

It hasn’t always been that way. I used to be terrified of making them and only pulled out my recipe during weekends when we had company. And really, who isn’t scared of making a fool out of themselves in front of others and who isn’t terrified that the eggs won’t stick and make a mess out of your lovingly prepared masterpiece and causing the aforementioned fool-making/feeling behavior?

Humble Beginnings

The reality is, omelettes are a humble food, perfectly suited for those moments when you need something to eat, have tons of leftovers you’re not sure what to do with, and don’t want to spend hours in the kitchen. If you’re really short on time and patience there is nothing quite so satisfying as a warm cheese omelette whipped up in less than ten minutes. And while everyone is familiar with the lovely “Western” omelette of ham, cheese, peppers, and onions, two eggs slightly whipped make the perfect envelope for almost anything you have in your fridge. It’s incredibly freeing to think of omelettes as “only scrambled eggs with stuff inside” which is really what they are. Who cares that it’s folded half instead of perfect thirds, or if it breaks a little in the center, or there are holes here and there? It’s scrambled eggs with stuff in the middle! It will be delicious! And if not, start over again; you’ll have another, better version in five minutes or less.

Preparing the Mise

I am not a pro by any means, so don’t think this is something that is beyond your capabilities. I will offer a few tips that have helped me out ::

  • Use a non-stick pan that’s not scratched or beaten up
  • Take the time to heat-up your fillings, whatever they may be, well, except for the cheese as that’s just messy
  • Get everything set up ahead of time because the eggs cook quickly
  • Two eggs, beaten lightly (streaks are just fine!) with salt and pepper, added to melted butter in a low-heated pan is all you need
  • Once the edges of the eggs start to set ever-so-slightly, push them toward the center and let the rest of the runny egg flow to the edges
  • Place your fillings on one half of your eggs now, and allow the eggs to set
  • Let the whole omelette slide off your pan and then gentle flip the last empty half over the fillings
  • Sprinkle with a bit of chopped herbs

Non Stick Pan

I like to heat the plates up in the microwave to keep the eggs warm just a bit longer. It’s easy to do, but not at all necessary. I place a damp paper towel on top of each pate before stacking the next, then run it for three minutes or so. You don’t want the plates too hot to handle, and three minutes in our microwave gets them to just the perfect temperature. As an added bonus, your plates are all ready to go, which is always always the last thing I scramble for once I realize the first omelette is done.

Warming the Plates

And really, many times the omelettes are eaten faster than they can cool, so there’s another strike against wasting the microwave energy!

All Plated Up

We’ve had omelettes filled with leftover greens; omelettes made from butter braised radishes straight from the garden; and although this one is super fancy and qualifies as “company food” last week we had omelettes made from leftover lobster and potatoes with a touch of raclette cheese, this one right here below…

Omelette Almost Gone

…which I almost forgot to take a picture of before I demolished it entirely.

We’ve had a slight snag in omelette making recently, when one of our children was diagnosed with a bit of an egg allergy, and I have to admit it curtailed many a quick dinner plan for us. Recently, I realized that I could substitue a quick crepe instead of the scrambled eggs, which has made it a great deal easier to pull together an super fast meal for us all.

So, yes, omelettes and me are back on again, and I couldn’t be happier! I’d love to hear what kind of omelettes you’re making!

Food on Friday :: More From Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem

I am possibly, maybe, slightly obsessed with the food from Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem. It all seems so fresh and creative and beautiful and, well, alive. Not only are the recipes undeniably tasty, but I feel so healthy and good after eating them, these two especially.

Swiss Chard with Tahini, Yogurt, Buttered Pine Nuts

The Swiss Chard with Tahini, Yogurt, Buttered Pine Nuts is quick, easy, and my favorite meal for the past week. I’m on my third batch. The yogurt tahini sauce is lovely, but a nice dollop of labne, ever so slightly thinned with water, is also beautiful.

Roasted Cauliflower & Hazelnut salad

This is going to be my go-to salad recipe for the remainder of the winter. We’ve made the Roasted Cauliflower & Hazelnut Salad several times now, although here you see it with roasted Brussel Sprouts. It’s nearly impossible to decide which one is better. With whole leaf parsley, crispy celery, and pomegranate (which plays amazing well off of the hazelnuts), and a lovely wisp of dressing including maple syrup (just a touch!), sherry vinegar allspice, and cinnamon, this salad is somehow simultaneously hearty and refreshing, a perfect foil for heavy holiday fare. On night’s when we want to make it a touch more substantial, we add a few smoked mackerel or sardines.

I’m on my last little bit of chard, and I have another head of cauliflower in the fridge, so I’ll be covered for the weekend at least. Then I suppose I should try another recipe or two.